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Fairy and Folk Tales of the Irish Peasantry

By William Butler Yeats & Mint Editions
Fairy and Folk Tales of the Irish Peasantry by William Butler Yeats & Mint Editions digital book - Fable

Publisher Description

Fairy and Folk Tales of the Irish Peasantry (1888) is a collection of stories edited by W.B. Yeats. Compiled at the height of the Celtic Twilight, a movement to revive the myths and traditions of Ancient Ireland, Fairy and Folk Tales of the Irish Peasantry captures a wide range of stories, songs, poems, and firsthand accounts from artists and storytellers dedicated to the preservation of Irish culture.

In “Frank Martin and the Fairies,” a sickly man discusses the presence of dozens of fairies inside his weaving shop. When a child in his village falls ill, he claims to have seen the fairies building a small, simple coffin, preparing to convey the poor youth from the world of men to their own, shadowy realm. “Bewitched Butter,” a tale from Donegal, recounts a strange event involving two farming families and a prized Kerry cow. When the young Grace Dogherty arrives on the Hanlon’s doorstep asking to milk their cow, Mrs. Hanlon initially refuses her. But after several entreaties, the matriarch relents, allowing the girl to take some of the Kerry cow’s milk. When Moiley stops producing milk, the Hanlon’s fear that Grace has cast an evil eye on the cow, thereby threatening their livelihood. Fairy and Folk Tales of the Irish Peasantry compiles numerous tales of giants, gods, devils, kings and heroes, preserving the legends of Ireland’s past, an age threatened with erasure by science, reason, and modern industrialization.

This edition of W.B. Yeats’s Fairy and Folk Tales of the Irish Peasantry is a classic of Irish literature reimagined for modern readers.

Since our inception in 2020, Mint Editions has kept sustainability and innovation at the forefront of our mission. Each and every Mint Edition title gets a fresh, professionally typeset manuscript and a dazzling new cover, all while maintaining the integrity of the original book.

With thousands of titles in our collection, we aim to spotlight diverse public domain works to help them find modern audiences. Mint Editions celebrates a breadth of literary works, curated from both canonical and overlooked classics from writers around the globe.

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About William Butler Yeats

W.B. Yeats (1865-1939) was an Irish poet. Born in Sandymount, Yeats was raised between Sligo, England, and Dublin by John Butler Yeats, a prominent painter, and Susan Mary Pollexfen, the daughter of a wealthy merchant family. He began writing poetry around the age of seventeen, influenced by the Romantics and the Pre-Raphaelite Brotherhood, but soon turned to Irish folklore and the mystical writings of William Blake for inspiration. As a young man he joined and founded several occult societies, including the Dublin Hermetic Order and the Hermetic Order of the Golden Dawn, participating in séances and rituals as well as acting as a recruiter. While these interests continued throughout Yeats’ life, the poet dedicated much of his middle years to the struggle for Irish independence. In 1904, alongside John Millington Synge, Florence Farr, the Fay brothers, and Annie Horniman, Yeats founded the Abbey Theatre in Dublin, which opened with his play Cathleen ni Houlihan and Lady Gregory’s Spreading the News and remains Ireland’s premier venue for the dramatic arts to this day. Although he was an Irish Nationalist, and despite his work toward establishing a distinctly Irish movement in the arts, Yeats—as is evident in his poem “Easter, 1916”—struggled to identify his idealism with the sectarian violence that emerged with the Easter Rising in 1916. Following the establishment of the Irish Free State in 1922, however, Yeats was appointed to the role of Senator and served two terms in the position. He was awarded the Nobel Prize in Literature in 1923, and continued to write and publish poetry, philosophical and occult writings, and plays until his death in 1939.

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